Do Pets Sweat? How Cats and Dogs Stay Cool

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

pets sweatMost people have never considered whether or not pets sweat. After all, with all that fur, it’s a bit hard to discern the same signs as when people sweat, and pets don’t get body odor. In reality, however, cats and dogs do sweat – just not in the same manner as humans.

Keep reading to learn more about how pets sweat and how their bodies are designed to stay cool during hot weather.

Do Pets Sweat?

Our bodies come complete with numerous sweat glands along the skin’s surface, which allow us to perspire and release heat from the body. While our furry companions don’t possess the same number of sweat glands, they do have some, which are primarily located in the paw pads. Since their bodies are covered in thick fur, they have different ways to regulate body temperature.

Continue…

Hairballs: Common Feline Foe or an Owner’s Worst Nemesis?

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

hariballsHairballs are usually fine – that is, until they become a serious problem. To be sure, a monthly hairball “incident” is considered normal. However, if your furry, fluffy feline happens to retch a little too regularly, it’s time for a closer look. But don’t worry! Of all the subjects The Pet Experts at Wheaton Animal Hospital specialize in, feline hairballs are at the top of our list.

Rough Tongue

Your cat’s tongue is scratchy like sandpaper because of tiny spikes called papillae. These are instrumental in grooming thick, loose, or dirty fur, but like a human hairbrush, hair piles up on the papillae and is swallowed.

Continue…

It’s Meow Time: A Strategy for Indoor Cat Care

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

indoor cat careAfter hundreds of years as strictly agents in pest control, cats are now among our closest animal companions. Historically, many cats were never allowed to come inside a residence (much less rule one like the ones we know!). These days, however, owners are encouraged to keep their cats inside. Exposure to injury or illness just isn’t worth it when you consider the many positive facets of indoor cat care.

Safety and Wellness

Cats have a reputation for being a low-maintenance pet, but that doesn’t mean they don’t need (or benefit from) veterinary support. While indoor-only cats may not be at risk of falling from a tree, getting into a fight, or suffering a run-in with a car, they still need protection from the following:

Continue…

Seasonal Allergies in Pets: Helping Your Furry Friend Cope

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

Springtime, as wonderful as it is after a long winter, isn’t all fun and games for seasonal allergy sufferers. Runny noses, watery eyes, scratchy throats, and endless sneezing go hand in hand with the changing seasons for many of us.

Pets can also suffer from seasonal allergies, but their symptoms often go overlooked. Learning how to spot seasonal allergies in pets, and understand what you can do to help, can make a world of difference for a suffering pet.

Continue…

Cleaning House and Garden With an Eye on Spring Pet Safety

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

After daylight savings comes and goes, we’re faced with endless seasonal possibilities – and countless chores. To be sure, the extra time in the day allows for more productivity, but where does that leave Fluffy or Fido?

Your pet may be unimpressed by your spring cleaning endeavors or perhaps he or she wants to get in the middle of things. Likewise, your pet could feel unsettled or confused by the increased activity, new smells, and less couch time together. Whatever the case may be, keeping an eye on spring pet safety ensures that everyone enjoys the season in good health. That’s where The Pet Experts at Wheaton Animal Hospital comes in!

Continue…

Train Your Cat to Walk on a Leash? You Bet!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

Just when you thought you had heard of everything, we’re now learning how training techniques can be applied to our feline friends, and how those techniques can provide them with numerous benefits to their health, safety, and fun. One of these important training techniques involves leashing training, which allows cat lovers everywhere to enjoy what dog owners have been doing for decades!

But if you have doubts about how to train your cat to walk on a leash, never fear! The Pet Experts at Wheaton Animal Hospital have you covered.

Continue…

The Very Real Threat of Coyotes to Your Pet

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

If you’ve seen a coyote recently, you are not alone. These highly adaptable animals are becoming more common in and around developed areas, due in large part to the sheer variety of possible shelters and abundant refuse to eat.

Coyotes have certainly earned their place on the food chain (and continue to be important contributors to the ecological community), but the threat of coyotes to your pet is sizable. In an effort to protect your pet from a dangerous attack or altercation, The Pet Experts at Wheaton Animal Hospital offer the following tips.

In Check

Coyotes are enormously helpful in keeping the rodent population down, but they’re easily lured away from their territories by the smell of food. Their proximity to our front doors and backyards can alternate between surprising and unsettling, but the bottom line is that safety measures should always be observed and carried out.

Continue…

Snowed In! How to Keep Your Pet Active During Winter

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

The first moment that an animal experiences snow is unlike any other. Many pets take to the flurries and drifts with unbridled (and contagious) enthusiasm. Others, however, harbor deep skepticism – or abject horror – when venturing outside their warm, cozy home.

Consider yourself lucky if your pet can’t get enough of the freezing, blustery weather. However, should your pet require ringing endorsements for winter’s finer qualities, The Pet Experts can provide a few. To this end, check out our tips to keep your pet active during winter. Even if you get snowed in, you won’t get cabin fever!

Wise Words

Before we dive into some ideas to keep your pet active during winter, The Pet Experts would like to remind owners of the myriad dangers of winter weather: Continue…

The Mystery Behind Why Cats Sleep so Much

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

Sleeping catBeing a master of stealth requires a great deal of energy. For cats, they have to be able to wait for any kind of action for hours on end (all the pouncing, pawing, hunting, stalking, and running notwithstanding). Plus, jumping to dizzyingly high places or perching dangerously on the edge can make anyone feel a bit, well, drowsy to say the least.

The Pet Experts at Wheaton Animal Hospital ask – are these the reasons cats sleep so darn much?

Nocturnal, Diurnal, or Crepuscular?

Cats are commonly mistaken for nocturnal mammals, but they’re actually most active during the hours surrounding dawn and dusk. That makes them a crepuscular species, and their sleeping patterns reflect this. These times of day are not only prime for hunting small rodents, but they also happen to be when a cat’s predators are mostly inactive.

Continue…

Cabin Fever? Not With These Winter Activities for Your New Pet!

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestShare on TumblrShare on LinkedIn

dachshundWe’re not going to see any warm weather for weeks (or months!), but that doesn’t mean your newly adopted pet can’t enjoy the get-up-and-go they deserve. To be sure, one of the more successful ways to acclimate a new pet is to provide outlets for all that extra energy. Unfortunately, the short, frigid winter days make this challenging. It’s not impossible, though, and The Pet Experts have a few winter activities for your new pet to last until the first crocus pops up.

The Obvious

If it’s above freezing, bundle up and head out to any number of local community and/or dog parks. While only older puppies who have received complete vaccinations should embark on public outings, all pets can benefit from fresh air and scenery (provided they’re also sufficiently socialized).

Continue…